Dressed to Impress: Adornment in Early Modern Japan

event image for Dressed to Impress: Adornment in  Early Modern Japan
Date: 10 November 2017
Time: 19:00 - 20:00
Location: BRLSI
Admission: Public £6; Friends/Students £3

Speaker: Dr Nicole Rousmaniere (IFAC Handa Curator of Japanese Arts, British Museum)
Netsuke (toggles), literally meaning ‘root’ (ne) ‘to attach’ (tsuke), are a form of Japanese miniature sculpture that was primarily functional. Used by men during the Edo period (1615-1868) to fasten tobacco, money and medicine pouches to their sashes, netsuke expressed the owner’s style and financial status. Netsuke can be viewed as a form of conspicuous consumption in an age of sumptuary laws and strict social class boundaries. This talk examines the important role of decoration in Japan as a social signifier from the Muromachi period (1336-1573) through to the early Meiji era (1868-1912).

Supported by:

British Museum logo




Chinese couple playing a flute. Japan, about 1700
©The Trustees of the Bristish Museum

Calendar

November 2017
M T W T F S S
« Oct   Dec »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

We hope that you enjoy all of our events but to avoid any confusion please:

  • Check all details and any restrictions relating to an event thoroughly before booking
  • Payment for all events must be made at the time of your booking either online or through our reception
  • All event tickets purchased are non-refundable
    due to the limited space, all events held at the MEAA require booking, including free events

Read full details

Add to your Calendar 10 November 2017 19:00 10 November 2017 20:00 Europe/London [MEAA] Dressed to Impress: Adornment in Early Modern Japan

Speaker: Dr Nicole Rousmaniere (IFAC Handa Curator of Japanese Arts, British Museum)
Netsuke (toggles), literally meaning ‘root’ (ne) ‘to attach’ (tsuke), are a form of Japanese miniature sculpture that was primarily functional. Used by men during the Edo period (1615-1868) to fasten tobacco, money and medicine pouches to their sashes, netsuke expressed the owner’s style and financial status. Netsuke can be viewed as a form of conspicuous consumption in an age of sumptuary laws and strict social class boundaries. This talk examines the important role of decoration in Japan as a social signifier from the Muromachi period (1336-1573) through to the early Meiji era (1868-1912).

Supported by:

British Museum logo

Museum of East Asian Art info@meaa.org.uk false DD/MM/YYYY